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News From the Center

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National Humanities Center Names 2023–24 Teacher Advisory Council

The National Humanities Center has announced the selection of twenty talented educators from across the country as members of its 2023–24 Teacher Advisory Council. These teachers, from schools in twelve states, will work with the Center’s staff in piloting, evaluating, and promoting NHC resources and professional development programs for collegiate and pre-collegiate educators.

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National Humanities Center Board Welcomes New Member

At its recent meeting, the Board of Trustees of the National Humanities Center elected Yolonda Y. Wilson (NHC Fellow, 2019–20) from St. Louis University as the Center’s newest trustee. Wilson is a philosopher whose work focuses primarily on African American political philosophy, bioethics, feminist philosophy, law and morality, and related topics.

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The National Humanities Center Announces 2023–24 Fellows

The National Humanities Center is pleased to announce the appointment of 35 Fellows for the academic year 2023–24. These leading scholars will come to the Center from universities and colleges in 16 US states as well as Canada, Hong Kong, Nigeria, Singapore, South Africa, Taiwan, and the United Kingdom. Chosen from 541 applicants, they represent humanistic scholarship in a wide range of academic disciplines.

Black Lives Matter slogan painted on the street in Washington, DC

New NHC Institute Builds on Efforts to Strengthen Teaching in African American Studies

The National Humanities Center is working to help teachers with questions about the civil rights struggle and other topics in African American studies through its Teaching African American Studies Institutes. The newest of these, More Than a Slogan: Understanding the Historical Context of Black Lives Matter (February 6–10), will provide an immersive, hands-on learning experience to help educators better understand the approaches and historical perspectives required to teach African American studies to K–12 students.