Coming Events

  • Making Negro Literature: Literary Workspaces at the Margins of Print Culture

Making Negro Literature: Literary Workspaces at the Margins of Print Culture

As part of her ongoing effort to chronicle African American literary culture at the turn from the nineteenth to the twentieth century, Elizabeth McHenry has been focusing on African American bibliographies, which emerged as experimental knowledge structures that provided ways of mapping and making sense of an emerging and rapidly evolving canon of “Negro literature.” These bibliographies were not just “lists,” but exploratory documents, where black intellectuals thought critically and advanced arguments about the boundaries and contours of black literature and authorship.

Thursday, April 20, 2017 at 6:00 p.m.
Elizabeth McHenry, New York University

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  • Vicious Vikings as Cultural Ambassadors

Vicious Vikings as Cultural Ambassadors

Popular sources present the Vikings as ruthless warriors yet also take great pains to portray their decorated weapons, jewelry, clothing, houses, and ships—that is, their art. In this talk Nancy Wicker will discuss the patrons who sponsored that art, the artisans who made the objects, and the men and women who used the works, at home in Scandinavia as well as across the diaspora where Vikings raided, traded, and settled, from the North Atlantic to Russia and beyond.

Thursday, April 13, 2017 at 6 p.m.
Nancy Wicker, University of Mississippi

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  • Textiles in Tiers: Selected Works from Sandy Milroy, Trudy Thomson, and Rose Warner

Textiles in Tiers: Selected Works from Sandy Milroy, Trudy Thomson, and Rose Warner

“Textiles in Tiers” showcases the work of Chapel Hill artists Sandy Milroy, Trudy Thomson, and Rose Warner. Using a mix of materials and a variety of techniques, these three artists create colorful, textured pieces that captivate and intrigue. And, while each artist’s works speak to their distinctive vision and approach, it is quickly apparent that they share a vernacular and a keen attention to bold expressions built on layers of intricate detail.

January 9 – May 25, 2017
Artists’ Reception: Sunday, January 29, 2017

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Recent NewsSee all

  • National Humanities Center Names Fellows for 2017-18

National Humanities Center Names Fellows for 2017-18

  • March 29, 2017

The Center announces the appointment of 35 Fellows for the academic year 2017-18. These leading scholars will come from 15 states, Greece, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. Chosen from 630 applicants, they represent humanistic scholarship in English language and literature; environmental studies; European languages and literature; history; history of science; medieval studies; music history and musicology; philosophy; religion; sociology; South Asian studies; and theater, dance, and performance studies.

  • Triangle Digital Humanities Network Spring Colloquium and Reception

Triangle Digital Humanities Network Spring Colloquium and Reception

  • February 23, 2017

The National Humanities Center will host the Triangle Digital Humanities Network Spring Colloquium on April 7, 2017. The event will bring together digital humanists from the Triangle area to make connections and to learn about digital research currently underway in local graduate programs. The event will feature brief research presentations by area digital humanities graduate students and information about ongoing collaborative digital projects being conducted by the Center.

  • Spring 2017 America in Class<sup>®</sup> Webinars to Feature Sessions on Islam in America, John F. Kennedy, the Poetry of Rita Dove, More

Spring 2017 America in Class® Webinars to Feature Sessions on Islam in America, John F. Kennedy, the Poetry of Rita Dove, More

  • January 3, 2017

The National Humanities Center has announced its program of spring 2017 professional development webinars for humanities teachers covering a wide range of topics including the cultural history of Islam in America, television and the presidency of John F. Kennedy, understanding the Black Lives Matter movement in its historical context, the poetry of Pulitzer Prize winner Rita Dove, and cultivating philosophical thinking with students.

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Podcasts See all

  • Erin Beeghly, “The Ethics and Epistemology of Stereotypes”

Erin Beeghly, “The Ethics and Epistemology of Stereotypes”

  • March 29, 2017

Most people would agree that judging people based on generalizations related to their skin color or gender, religion or nationality is wrong. Yet ​this is a common practice in all societies​​. So the question arises, is it ever okay to use stereotypes? And, if so, when?

  • Zsuzsanna Gulácsi, “Art and Religious Instruction in Late Ancient and Medieval Asia”

Zsuzsanna Gulácsi, “Art and Religious Instruction in Late Ancient and Medieval Asia”

  • March 15, 2017

Beyond their inspirational and devotional power, what other functions do religious works of art serve? From antiquity through the medieval periods, ​​practitioners ​of many religious traditions ​throughout central Asia used ​works of art to teach​ followers religious histories, parables, and central tenets of their faith.​ How does this use inform our appreciation of these works and what can we learn from examining these religious practices?

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VideosSee all

  • Robert D. Newman, “Rage and Beauty: Celebrating Complexity, Democracy and the Humanities”

Robert D. Newman, “Rage and Beauty: Celebrating Complexity, Democracy and the Humanities”

  • January 18, 2017

On October 5, 2016, NHC director Robert D. Newman delivered a keynote address as a part of the ongoing Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina Speaker Series at North Carolina Central University. ​In his remarks Newman touched on events as seemingly disparate as the workings of the Continental Congress and the social media origins of the Black Lives Matter movement and discussed the ways that the humanities help us understand the world, relate to one another, and come to terms with the most profound experiences and questions — on the nature of beauty, the search for justice, and the meaning of life in the face of horrific violence and our own mortality.

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