Art & Soul: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Teaching Black Music and Art in the Humanities Classroom | National Humanities Center

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Art & Soul: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Teaching Black Music and Art in the Humanities Classroom

Teaching African American Studies Summer Institute
July 8–12, 2024 at the National Humanities Center

African American Studies; African American Music; American Civil Rights Movement; Harlem Renaissance; Jazz; Hip Hop; Poetry

Black man's hands playing music on a piano
Romare Bearden, “Jammin at the Savoy,” 1981–82
“But art is not simply works of art; it is the spirit that knows Beauty, that has music in its soul and the color of sunsets in its handkerchiefs; that can dance on a flaming world and make the world dance, too. Such is the soul of the Negro.” –W.E.B. Dubois

Whether through work, worship, advocacy, or celebration, Black music and art have played a vital role in the formation of American identity.  Centuries-long movements for emancipation, civil rights, and equality were masterfully chronicled by Black musicians and artists whose contributions were incorporated into the greater narrative of the American experience. Centering the works of Black musicians and artisans in the humanities classroom helps students more fully grasp the indispensability of the African American voice to our national history.

In partnership with the Ruth J. Simmons Center for Race and Justice at Prairie View A&M University, the National Humanities Center is proud to host the 2024 Teaching African American Studies Summer Institute, “Art & Soul: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Teaching Black Music and Art in the Humanities Classroom.” Conceived as a pedagogical response to persistent, race-based inequities, this institute is the last in a three-year collaboration. Open to all K–12 educators, this institute will provide an immersive, hands-on learning experience to better understand the approaches and the historical perspective required to create and teach African American studies. Each day’s sessions will include readings, viewings, and primary source analysis by expert scholars.

Applications and Eligibility

Applications accepted December 1, 2023–March 15, 2024.

All current K–12 educators are eligible for this program. However, this institute is primarily designed for middle grades (6–8) and secondary level (9–12) educators. Applicant must be a full-time educator for the 2024–25 academic year. Participants will be selected from a competitive application pool. Each participant will receive reimbursement for travel, and a stipend upon the successful completion of the institute.

For more information, contact NHC Education Programs.

To be considered, please submit the following three pdf documents via this application form by March 15, 2024 at 5:00pm ET. Selection announcements will be made April 1, 2024.

  • Letter of interest (1-page maximum)
  • Letter of support from direct supervisor
  • Current CV or resume (5-page maximum)

Facilitators

  • African American Studies; African American Music; American Civil Rights Movement; Harlem Renaissance; Jazz; Hip Hop; Poetry

    Marco Robinson

    Assistant Director of the Ruth J. Simmons Center for Race and Justice; Associate Professor of History, Prairie View A&M University

  • African American Studies; African American Music; American Civil Rights Movement; Harlem Renaissance; Jazz; Hip Hop; Poetry

    Mike Williams

    Director of Education Programs, National Humanities Center

  • African American Studies; African American Music; American Civil Rights Movement; Harlem Renaissance; Jazz; Hip Hop; Poetry

    Raven Ferguson

    Education Programs Coordinator, National Humanities Center