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Humanities in Class Online Course Instructors

The National Humanities Center offers a wide range of online courses that provide deep investigations into compelling topics in the humanities. Each course is developed with an established scholar in the field, who helps develop activities and provides resources for group discussions and individual research. Our goal is to facilitate a learning experience that will result in classroom-ready instructional materials. Our instructor pool is comprised of experienced, talented educators and scholars in humanities education.
NHC Online Course Instructors

Kylie Broderick


Broderick is a PhD student and Mellon Fellow in modern Middle East history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is also the managing editor of Jadaliyya and a coeditor of the Resistance, Subversion, and Mobilization page. Her interests are in the political economy of the Middle East, as well as histories of gender, social mobilizations, and socioeconomic class construction in Lebanon and Syria.


Chris Bunin

Chris Bunin
Bunin is a teacher of AP human geography, world history, and geospatial technologies at Albemarle High School in Charlottesville, Virginia. During the past decade he has collaborated on projects focused on leveraging geospatial technologies and geo-literacy in the classroom. These include: “The Virginia Experiment” and “America on the World Stage” Teaching American History Projects; the iSTEM Teacher Scholars Program: An Applied Geospatial Curriculum for Middle Schools; “Transatlantic Teacher Scholars: Change Over Time and Place in the Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery”; ESRI’s GeoInquiries for U.S. history and human geography; the U.S. Census Bureau’s Statistics in Schools Program; and the award winning book Jamestown to Appomattox: Mapping U.S. History Using GIS (Carte Diem Press). He is also assistant professor of geography at Piedmont Virginia Community College and a member of the Virginia Geographic Alliance Steering Committee. Bunin was named the 2016 Secondary Social Studies Teacher of the Year by the National Council for the Social Studies.


LaShonda R. Carter


Carter is a PhD student in the Program in Culture and Theory at the University of California, Irvine. As an interdisciplinary scholar, her research bridges multiple disciplines in the humanities and social science. Her research interests are in political theory, gender and politics, Black political thought and histories through interpretative, qualitative, and archival methods. Carter’s teaching interests include English, literature, American political development, political communication, media and politics on Black feminist theory, African American political history, and interpretive and archival methods. She is well-versed in teaching courses in English, literature, Black feminist theory, Black studies, community-based research with oral histories, and interpretative and archival methodologies.


Joshua Cracraft, PhD

Joshua Cracraft
Cracraft is a historian and educator who specializes in American history, social studies education, and global learning. He has worked or conducted research on five continents and has classroom teaching experience at the K–12 and college levels. He has an AB in government from Harvard University and a PhD in American history from Brandeis University.


Lindsey Galvao

Lindsey Galvao
Teacher Advisory Council Member, 2020–21
Galvao received her BA in history from Northwestern University and her MA in history from Brown University. An experienced social studies teacher, Galvao taught grades 5–12 for ten years. She has also worked as a legislative aide for the fifth Middlesex District in the Massachusetts State Legislature and served as the research director for the House Committee on Post Audit and Oversight. Throughout her career, Galvao has been an instructor for numerous professional development workshops at Primary Source and served on the National Humanities Center’s Teacher Advisory Council during the 2020–21 academic year. She has written social studies lesson plans for the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and articles for Tutored By Teachers and We Are Teachers. She now works for public media as the social students curriculum specialist at GBH Boston.


Kimberly Gilman

Kimberly Gilman
Gilman teaches pre-AP and ESL social studies and geography at a Title I middle school outside Kansas City. Her teaching philosophy is learning by doing including hands-on history labs, field experiences, problem solving, and collaboration. She encourages her students to generate more questions than answers. Before becoming a teacher, she worked as a legislative assistant on Capitol Hill, designed historic preservation programs for communities, and worked in a public library. She loves to travel and has participated in Gilder-Lehrman fellowships at Columbia University and The University of Texas, and Fulbright-Hays fellowships in the Czech Republic and Poland. She has toured Germany as a Transatlantic Outreach (TOP) Fellow and taught lessons and professional development in India through IREX Teachers for Global Classrooms (TGC). She serves as vice chair of the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) Technology Leadership Team and has presented on anti-bias, sustainability, social movements, primary sources, biodiversity, and educational technology. She is on the boards of the Kansas Council for History Education (KCHE) and the Kansas Geographic Alliance (KGA). Gilman sponsors the National Geographic Bee and the student council. She serves on her district curriculum council and as a mentor and tutor for students. She is also involved in the KC Serves volunteer community and the Change the Truth organization in Uganda. She is active in the KC Hiking Club and Sierra Club.


Guy Hill


Hill, a native of the Bronx, NY, has been an English teacher for 24 years and currently teaches at Triton High School in Harnett County, NC. He also worked as an adjunct professor in the English Department at Campbell University. Hill is a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Wake Forest University. He served on the North Carolina 10th Grade Writing Test Committee and NCDPI’s English Language Arts Advisory Committee. He was president of the North Carolina English Teachers Association (NCETA) and was also a member of the NCETA Board of Directors. Hill served on former governor Beverly Perdue’s Teacher Advisory Committee and currently serves on Governor Roy Cooper’s DRIVE (Developing a Representative and Inclusive Vision for Education) Task Force.

Maureen Lamb

Maureen Lamb
Teacher Advisory Council Member, 2020–21
Lamb is the language department chair and academic technology coordinator at Kingswood Oxford School in West Hartford, CT. She is dedicated to using best practices and creating community in language teaching and technology, and she has shared her work on teaching languages at national, regional, and state conferences. She was recognized for her work as the CT Language Teacher of the Year, NECTFL Mead Fellow, CANE Weincke Award, and the ACL Elizabeth Watkins Award. Lamb is dedicated to creating an inclusive classroom environment, using technology to enhance the student experience, and to making Classics comprehensible. Originally from Quincy, MA, she was not only John Adams for Halloween, but she also performed as John Adams at National History Day in 2002, where her performance won Best in State for Massachusetts. She is passionate about combining her love of learning and local history, and she is so excited to be teaching for the National Humanities Center.


Sara Layton

Sara Layton
Teacher Advisory Council Member, 2018–19
Layton graduated with her BA and MA in English from Brigham Young University and has taught on the college and high school levels for twenty years. In 2017 she won the PBS Digital Innovator Award and represented Utah at a teacher summit in San Antonio. Other career highlights include receiving the Utah Charter School Teacher of the Year award in 2015, and being both a fellow and consultant for the Institute for the Study of Knowledge Management in Education (ISKME), where she teaches other educators to use and create open educational resources.


Michael Markofski

Michael Markofski
Markofski is a dedicated teacher and chair of the Digital Media Department at the Ascend Leadership Academy in Sanford, NC. Prior to joining the Ascend Leadership staff, he held an international teaching position teaching language in Nishiki, Kumamoto. In his early teaching career, Markofski was instrumental in designing a project-based digital media, cinematography, and engineering curriculum at Warren New Tech High School. His research beyond the classroom has taken him to Scotland, London, Ghana, and various locations in Japan where he immersed himself in the culture while training as a rikishi (力士) in the sport of sumo wrestling. Along with his Ascend teaching duties, he is also the head coach of the Aviator Esports team.


Kisha Tracy, PhD

Kisha Tracy Tracy is an assistant professor of English Studies at Fitchburg State University, specializing in early British and world literature. She is also co-coordinator of the FSU Center for Teaching and Learning. She received her PhD in Medieval studies from the University of Connecticut in 2010. She is the author of Memory and Confession in Middle English Literature, which explores how the traditional medieval relationship between memory and confession provides a valuable framework for understanding the employment of recollection in various Middle English literary texts. Tracy’s interests, both teaching, and research, are wide-ranging, from classical literature and Anglo-Saxon to Chaucer and film studies with the American Civil War thrown in for variety. In addition, she does a lot of research on encouraging student investment in learning, information literacy, and pedagogical wikis in higher education.


Cherry Whipple

Cherry Whipple
Teacher Advisory Council Member, 2017–18
Whipple received her BS in applied learning and development and currently teaches U.S. and world history at Austin High School in Austin, TX. She reads AP U.S. history exams for the College Board and has worked with Cengage Learning and Pearson Education in developing history assessment items. She will be working with a dual-enrollment program with the University of Texas at Austin in the fall of 2017. She loves spending time with her granddaughter.


Katie Willett

Katie Willett
Teacher Advisory Council Member, 2018–19
Willett, a native of Michigan and current resident of Charlotte, NC, is the director of the academy of international studies at Independence High School. As director, she works to develop students’ understanding of international relations and what it means to be a global learner and citizen. In this capacity, she leads a team of teachers and has developed programs of visiting speakers, seminar courses, and Model UN conferences, as well as international visits and exchanges. Before becoming the director, Willett taught U.S. history (AP and Honors) at Independence High for ten years, during which time she gained National Board and College Board certifications. Prior to this, she taught history in a secondary school in the UK as part of an international exchange program. Willett is passionate about fostering community understanding and broadening students’ educational aspirations and experience through the humanities. She loves to travel and has sought to broaden her own understanding by participation in the National Academy of Advanced Teacher Education Program, World View Study Tours, Center for European Studies Brussel Study Tour, and the Advanced Echoes and Reflections Seminar in Jerusalem. She has presented at Asia Society Conferences, North Carolina Social Studies Conferences, and with the Center for European Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.   @kmwbooksit

If you would like to receive information on how to become an NHC online instructor, please contact Mike Williams, Education Programs Manager.