Keith D. Miller, 2020–21

Who Wrote The Autobiography of Malcolm X?

John Hope Franklin Fellowship; William C. and Ida Friday Fellowship, 2020-21

Professor of English, Arizona State University

Keith Miller

Keith D. Miller is the author of Voice of Deliverance: The Language of Martin Luther King, Jr., and Its Sources and Martin Luther King’s Biblical Epic: His Great, Final Speech. His essays on King, Malcolm X, Jackie Robinson, Fannie Lou Hamer, and Frederick Douglass have appeared in many scholarly collections and in such flagship journals as Publication of the Modern Language Association, Journal of American History, College English, College Composition and Communication and Rhetoric Society Quarterly. His essay on “I Have a Dream” won the Theresa Enos Award as Best Essay of the Year in Rhetoric Review. He has lectured at Cambridge University, Chonbuk University (South Korea), Stanford University, Columbia University, Penn State University, University of Alabama, Florida State University, and elsewhere.  He is professor of English at Arizona State University, where, he previously served as writing program director in the Department of English and as a member of the University Promotion and Tenure Committee.

Selected Publications

Voice of Deliverance

  • Baker, Rene Billups, and Keith D. Miller. My Life with Charles Billups and Martin Luther King: Trauma and the Civil Rights Movement. Phoenix: Peacock Proud, 2019.
  • Miller, Keith D. “On Martin Luther King, Jr., Fannie Lou Hamer, and the Large Landscape of Civil Rights Rhetoric.” Rhetoric and Public Affairs 16 (Spring 2013): 167-83.
  • Miller, Keith D. Martin Luther King’s Biblical Epic: His Great, Final Speech. Jackson: University of Mississippi Press, 2012.
  • Miller, Keith D. “Plymouth Rock Landed on Us: Malcolm X’s Whiteness Theory as a Basis for Alternative Literacy.” College Composition and Communication 56, no. 2 (December 2004): 199-222.
  • Miller, Keith D. Voice of Deliverance: The Language of Martin Luther King, Jr., and Its Sources. 2nd ed. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1998.
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