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Contested Territory: America’s Involvement in Vietnam, 1945–75 | Reading List

A National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institute for K–12 Educators

July 18–29, 2022 at the National Humanities Center

OVERVIEW BIOGRAPHIES PARTICIPANTS READINGS HOUSING & TRAVEL ABOUT THE AREA APPLICATION

The following titles are assigned in support of individual seminars during the institute. Participants can access these readings in the Humanities in Class Digital Library.
  • “Visit of President Ngo Dinh Diem of Free Vietnam.” Department of State Bulletin 36, no. 935 (May 27, 1957): 851-55.
  • Alderman, Derek, Rodrigo Narro Perez, LaToya E. Eaves, Phil Klein, and Solange Muñoz. “Reflections on Operationalizing an Anti-Racism Pedagogy: Teaching as Regional Storytelling.” Journal of Geography in Higher Education 45, no. 2 (2020): 186–200.
  • Balaban, John. “The Poetry of Vietnam.” Asian Art & Culture 7, no. 1 (1994): 27-43.
  • Bradley, Mark. “Introduction: Liberty and the Making of Postcolonial Order.” In Imagining Vietnam and America: The Making of Postcolonial Vietnam, 1919-1950, 19-25. New Cold War History. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2000.
  • Bradley, Mark. “European Wind, American Rain: The United States in the Vietnamese Anticolonial Discourse.” In Imagining Vietnam and America: The Making of Postcolonial Vietnam, 1919-1950, 26-60. New Cold War History. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2000.
  • Bradley, Mark. “Trusteeship and the American Vision of Postcolonial Vietnam.” In Imagining Vietnam and America: The Making of Postcolonial Vietnam, 1919-1950, 89-122. New Cold War History. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2000.
  • Bunin, Chris. “Using Geospatial Technologies to Explore the Layers of Our Past.” American Historian (May 2018): 12-15.
  • Chapman, Jessica M. “Destroying the Sources of Demoralization.” In Cauldron of Resistance: Ngo Dinh Diem, the United States, and 1950s Southern Vietnam, 86-115. United States in the World. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2013.
  • Goscha, Christopher. “A Tale of Two Republics.” In Vietnam: A New History, 273-303. New York: Basic Books, 2016.
  • Goscha, Christopher. “Toward One Vietnam.” In Vietnam: A New History, 304-39. New York: Basic Books, 2016.
  • Goscha, Chris. “The 30-Years War in Vietnam.” New York Times, February 7, 2017.
  • Harper, T.N. “Prelude: On the Threshold of Free Asia, 1924.” In Underground Asia Global Revolutionaries and the Assault on Empire, 3-20. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2021.
  • Hunt, Andrew E. “The Highest Form of Patriotism.” In The Turning: A History of Vietnam Veterans against the War, 5-32. New York: New York University Press, 1999.
  • Jacobs, S. “‘Our System Demands the Supreme Being’: The U.S. Religious Revival and the ‘Diem Experiment,’ 1954–55.” Diplomatic History 25, no. 4 (2001): 589-624.
  • Lee, Mai Na. “Hmong Competition Finds Revolutionary Voices in the Kingdom of Laos (1946-60).” In Dreams of the Hmong Kingdom: The Quest for Legitimation in French Indochina, 1850-1960, 275-303. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press: 2015.
  • Lee, Mai Na. “The Women of ‘Dragon Capital’: Marriage Alliances and the Rise of Vang Pao.” In Claiming Place: On the Agency of Hmong Women, edited by Chia Vang, 87-116. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2016.
  • Littmann, William. “Viewpoint: Walk This Way: Reconsidering Walking for the Study of Cultural Landscapes.” Building & Landscapes 27, no. 1 (2020): 3-16.
  • Long, Ngo Vinh. “Vietnamese Perspectives.” In Encyclopedia of the Vietnam War, edited by Stanley I. Kutler, 592-611. U.S. History in Context; World History in Context. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1996.
  • McHale, Shawn F. “Empire, Racial Survival and Race Hatred.” In The First Vietnam War: Violence, Sovereignty, and the Fracture of the South, 1945-1956, 131-52. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2021.
  • Meinig, D.W. “The Beholding Eye: Ten Versions of the Same Scene.” In The Interpretation of Ordinary Landscapes: Geographical Essays, edited by D. W. Meinig, and John Brinckerhoff Jackson, 33-50. New York: Oxford University Press, 1979.
  • Miller, Edward. “Vision, Power and Agency: The Ascent of Ngô Dình Diêm, 1945–54.” Journal of Southeast Asian Studies 35, no. 3 (2004): 433–58.
  • Murrieta-Flores, Patricia and Bruno Martins. “The Geospatial Humanities: Past, Present and Future.” International Journal of Geographical Information Science 33, no. 12 (2019): 2424-229.
  • Ngo Vinh Long. “Legacies Foretold: Excavating the Roots of Postwar Viet Nam.” In Four Decades On: Vietnam, the United States, and the Legacies of the Second Indochina War, edited by Scott Laderman and Edwin Martini, 16-43. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2013.
  • Nguyen, An Thuy. “The Vietnam Women’s Movement for the Right to Live: A Non-communist Opposition Movement to the American War in Vietnam.” Critical Asian Studies 51, no. 1 (2019): 75-102.
  • Nguyen, Viet Thanh. “War Years.” In The Refugees, 49-72. New York: Grove Press, 2017.
  • Nhất Hạnh, Thích. “From a Letter by Thich Nhat Hanh Addressed to the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., June 1, 1965.” In Vietnam: Lotus in a Sea of Fire, 106-108. New York: Hill and Wang, 1967.
  • Scott, James. “Keeping the State at a Distance: The Peopling of the Hills.” In The Art of Not Being Governed: An Anarchist History of Upland Southeast Asia, 127-77. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2009.
  • Sterling, Eleanor, Martha Hurley, and Le Duc Minh. “An Introduction to Vietnam.” In Vietnam: A Natural History, 1-22. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2006.
  • Sterling, Eleanor, Martha Hurley, and Le Duc Minh. “Humans and the Environment.” In Vietnam: A Natural History, 23-44. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2006.
  • Wells, Tom. “1965.” In The War Within: America’s Battle Over Vietnam, 24-74. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1994.
  • Wood, Denis. “Signs in the Service of the State.” In Rethinking the Power of Maps, 67-85. New York: Guilford Press, 2010.

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